Monday, February 13, 2017

"No two calls are alike"



Harbor Departments Deputy Terry Smith
The storm that rolled through our harbor, the end of January 20,21 & 22nd, for three days did not break the record books for the most wind or damage but it did shake things up a bit.

In the past people have judged a storm strength by the amount of oranges that are floating out the harbor after a storm, today it is tennis balls and palm trees. This week I thought I would go a little deeper with you on the goings on around the harbor while the storm was passing overhead a couple of weekends ago.

My first call was into Deputy Terry Smith, of the Harbor Department, who was out on the harbor both Sunday and Monday of the three day storm. Out of a scale of 1-10, ten being the strongest, Deputy Smith felt this one was at a 6 or 7. Out of all the people that I have ever talked to about the harbor, Smith has been around longer than most. He has been working the harbor for 50 years now and was on duty in 1983 during the big one when it blew over 90 knots. “ I have seen docks floating down the harbor with boats still attached to them.” Smith said. Friday saw the wind reach 50 + knots while it rained the hardest on Sunday.

While pumping out boats that were filled with water and reattaching vessels that had broken free of their moorings the harbor patrol had their hands full this weekend. With their spare time they dragged large pieces of flotsam, large logs and tree stumps, back to their docks. Most of the flotsam is found just next to the ferry crossing and anywhere in the five point area.

As a racing sailor I wondered who does what on the sheriffs boat during extreme weather conditions, what type of gear do the deputy’s wear in storm conditions? I asked Deputy Smith, like on a race boat, do you send the kids up to the bow when the defecation hits the rotary oscillator? Does one crew member stay on the helm, how big is your crew, who does what?

Smith kind of chuckled “ No two calls are alike and we are all crossed trained todo any job. Our crew works well with three people aboard one of the fireboats. One person stays on the helm at all times while the other two crew secure the lines and make sure the props stay clear of lines.” Smith said. I laughed, while thinking to myself, knowing that I am one of the first to take the helm and ask the youth to go forward.

It was interesting to learn that 9 times out of 10 mooring lines break on the bow. Because of the tight quarters within the mooring fields “ It’s real important to secure the work boat to the mooring can, that way you will not go anywhere.” Smith said. My understanding is that the deputies will then either manually pull in or tow the vessel to reattach it to it’s mooring. There are times when the moorings will drag out of place and the vessel will need to be relocated. When the wind is up and the vessel has a lot of windage those are the ones the deputies refer to as whiteknuckler’s. 

As for the deputies crew wear it is import for them to protect their hands from the nylon mooring lines, and gloves are warn. Pant fouleys, rain gear, are always warn along with float jackets. Similar to situations at sea it stays a lot warmer when you do not work up a sweat under all the gear. In this job I don't know how they can do that.
BYC Dockmaster Matt Stanly

I made two more stops with the dock masters at the Balboa Yacht Club with Mat Stanley and Anthony Palacios at the Newport Harbor Yacht Club. These guys are the best at what they do and are a wealth of information.
Both BYC and NHYC boatsmen are extremely vigilant in maintaining their mooring gear and run constant inspections before and during storm conditions. All service boats have a crew of two and lifejackets are worn. Dockmaster Matt Stanley noticed 55 knots of wind on Sunday and had nothing unusual to report. “We got lucky this time, there was the usual flybridge covers that broke free, the rain came down rather hard this last round other than that we came through it pretty well.” Stanley said. 

NHYC Dockmaster Anthony Palacios

Over at NHYC Dock master Anthony Palacios had a micro burst of wind role over the club and noticed 61 knots of wind on Friday the first day of the storm. A neighbors roof peeled free and roofing shingles were seen floating by. Palacios also reported that one of the boats in the dry storage area was thrown from its cradle. “ About every three hours we were pumping water out of the Harbor 20’s, checking mooring lines, collecting all the kayaks and dinghies that floated into the mooring field. We had all hands on deck, during one of the rain squalls I could not see further than two hundred feet in front of me.” Palacios said.



BYC Stanley getting ready for for this weekends weather
Both of these dock masters are always concerned about mooring gear chafing and Stanley mentioned to me that West Marine rigging department has a new chafe guard called DC Guard whole core jacket. This jacket slides over the top of your mooring lines and protects the line from chafing. I went over to West Marine and talked to Kevin Morris in the rigging department and learned he can set you up with all your mooring lines needs from shackles to splicing tumbles. General Manager of West Marine Matt Jessner has agreed, through the rest of the month of February, to offer a 15% discount, for purchase’s on new mooring gear, to readers that mention The Daily Pilot Harbor Column.

Boat name of the month: Toyon



Sea ya

As you all know by now The Daily Pilot gave me the boot last week and will no longer run boating columns. Please return for your Harbor news!






Saturday, January 28, 2017

The Harbor Report: An exciting NHYC Winter Series



Only Child racing in the Harbor
 BY: Len Bose

It always seems this time of year I write my column without heading out onto the harbor first. With all the rain over the last week the only time I have been on my Harbor 20 is to pump out all the rain water.
That's not necessarily true, I have been attending the Newport Harbor Yacht Club's Winter Series and for the second year in a row I am getting beat up on the race course during this series.


With all the light or just fluky winds, along with huge currents running, I am having a hard time connecting the dots around the race course. People that seem to have a better idea on how to get around the course this time of year are Team Bissell and Team Sellinger. They are tied for first place in the C fleet and it will come down to the final day of the series on Feb. 5th.
In B fleet, Chris Hill and Nina Manning hold a small lead over Team Reed and Team Haynes. This will be a close series and everyone will have their game faces on for the last day of racing.
In A fleet, Argyle Campbell sailing "No Travel Required" has been sailing the most consistently this winter although Team Wise and Mark Conzelman sailing with Phil Thompson are staying within striking distance.
Speaking of striking distance you no longer need to concern yourself with running into the old No. 11 range marker. It has finally been removed after a year with dealing with the Coast Guard.
# 11 Channel Marker REMOVED!

I had to go look for myself to believe it and yes it is finally gone. The removal of the three remaining old telephone pole range markers remains a task for our City Council this year.
If you have ever run into one of these range markers you know what I am talking about. Remember to remind your city council members along with harbor commissioners that it is time to remove these ancient beasts from our harbor.
While making my rounds around the harbor, in my warm car, I noticed that the NHYC has a large three-story ship they are chartering from Hornblower as their clubhouse for the next year as they build a new clubhouse.

Racing ahead
It appears everything is going to plan from the outside and the club has a full racing calendar set for the upcoming season. It starts with the Islands race that starts in L.A. Harbor and goes around Catalina and San Clemente then finishes in San Diego. It's the perfect warm-up for the Newport Beach-to-Cabo race schedule to start March 10. We are hopefully attending both of these races ourselves aboard the Santa Cruz 50 Horizon to start our racing season.
Temp NHYC

News about a couple of other prominent racing boats have grabbed my attention this winter. The Santa Cruz 50 Flaca has been sold and will now live in Long Beach.
The Andrews 39 Bien Roulee has to my understanding been sold to a local Newport Beach racer, which is very good news.
On rather surprising news, the Andrews 49 It's OK and the Peterson 50 Checkmate have been donated to Orange Coast College. Let's hope these two boats stay in town and still show up on the local race course.
Basins New Ride

I went by Basin Shipyard recently and got a glimpse at Dave and Derek New's brand new wheels. The shipyard traded in their old Travel Lift for a brand new one with all the bells and whistles. Remote control, taller and much quieter, I never have been able to figure out the miles per gallon and I might have gone with some different rims but it looks really sharp.
 
Marine Recycling Center Dana Point
Harbor Commission meeting
I made it past the Harbor Commission meeting this month and was very glad to hear commissioner Kenny request to place on next month's agenda the idea of having a Marine Recycling Center in town. I have written about this idea a couple of times over the last seven years. I have noticed Marine Recycling Centers in Dana Point and up in L.A. Harbor. I feel having one our two centers in town will solve part of the problem of boaters using our pump-out stations incorrectly.
At the end of the meeting I had a chance to talk to Lt. Mark Alsobrook. Have I ever told you how tremendous it is to have our harbor master attend these meetings?
The subject quickly went to the weather. I brought up the fact that I have pumped out over 200 gallons of water this winter from my Harbor 20. Alsobrook quickly responded that's what his team has been doing a lot of this winter, pumping out water from the different moored boats.

Boat name of the week: "Just add Ice"
Sea ya!
--

LEN BOSE is an experienced boater, yacht broker and boating columnist for the Daily Pilot

Monday, January 02, 2017

The Harbor Report: Learning about sea level rise and flooding in Newport Harbor

Professor Brett Sanders of UC Irvine
By: Len Bose

I recall at the age of 5 attending a party at my Aunt Pauline's when I decide I wanted to join everyone in the pool. I just jumped in and ended up at the bottom of the deep end.

My father quickly came to my rescue, brought me to the surface and then started telling me how proud he was of me jumping in way over my head. I also remember it taking another year for me to ever leave the ankle and waist-high kiddie pool after that.

Why this story comes to mind while interviewing Professor Brett Sanders of UC Irvine in his lab at the Civil and Environmental Engineering building is beyond me. I guess it must be the fact that I was jumping in over my head again and was interested in learning more about sea level rise and flooding in Newport Harbor.

I happen to live in Huntington Beach in the low lying topography of the Santa Ana river flood plain, so this too sparks my interest in sea level rise.
Adam Luke

This story is not alarmist and I haven't started to build a replica of Noah's Ark. One of the first things I learned was that over the next 30 years there is about a 1% chance, in any given year, that we will see ankle or waist-high flooding around Newport Harbor.
Sanders and his team are working hydraulic modeling and 3-D mapping of the entire Newport Harbor Bay system, with the goal of creating a harbor-wide picture of what flood events can do. Two other members of Sanders' team, Jo Schubert and Adam Luke, attended the interview. In the new year there will be a website that the public can access and examine all the different features these maps will offer.
Jo Schubert

"We will be providing a tool that will bring the risk down to a household level and help communities to be better prepared for and manage flooding," Sanders said. "Decision-makers will benefit from a variety of different maps, depths and water movement."
One of the most interesting aspects of developing this model is how all the local information was gathered. A public door-to-door field survey was taken asking people where they have seen flooding in their neighborhoods.
Different city agencies were contacted and surveyed, including the Public Works, fire, sheriff and police departments.
"If you bring scientific experts together with local expertise and you allow them to work together to characterize the problem you get a tool or model that is scientifically credible and trusted by the community," Sanders said. "The need for flood-vulnerable communities to engage in a better conversation in flood resilience is imperative."

These maps will be used in a number of different ways. For example, flood risk mitigation plans can be made with regard to raising sea walls, raising homes' foundations, and making sandbags and sand berms. This will give homeowners the ability to better understand the risk of low-level flooding.
It will also more time to prepare by revealing the location, depth and strength of the flooding before it happens.
After flooding occurs these maps will help people understand which areas have been impacted, which are under water, blocking roads and how the community can rebuild. This model is a tool to help make decisions, allocate resources and manage risk.


Flooding around Newport Harbor can be triggered in many different ways. Upland flooding can be caused by a large amount of water flowing out of the San Diego Creek channel and into the neighboring floodplain. Around Newport Harbor, flooding is caused by high embayment water levels that result from a combination of high tides, positive ocean level anomalies from storms and/or inter-annual phenomena such as El NiƱo, and streamflow from San Diego Creek. The most severe flooding occurs with coinciding river flow, rainfall, high tides, sea level raise and waves.
Extreme events have cycles and I'm sure most of you recall the floods in 1983 and 2005.


"There is room for optimism, especially looking at the data over the last 20 years it looks like we are not approaching the extremely high sea level scenario," Luke said. "We are more like the medium to lower range scenario."
After coming out of this interview I still felt like I was the kid that was plucked out of the bottom of the pool and that I was way over my head in trying to understand all the information that was given to me over the last 90 minutes.
On the other hand I felt good that I had engaged the topic of flooding in our harbor and will do my best to pass this information on to my family and friends.

Boat name of the week: La Marea Alta.
Sea ya!


LEN BOSE is an experienced boater, yacht broker and boating columnist for the Daily Pilot.

Comments from readers:

Great article Len! We need to gently goad our politicians to be concerned about, and act to ward against looming dire predictions of the distant future while being totally engrossed with immediate daily distractions. We used to have a saying in construction - "When you are up to your ass in alligators it is easy to forget that the job on hand was to drain the swamp".
Keep up the good work!

Jim (Jamshed) Dastur



Thursday, December 29, 2016

The Harbor Report: Gate may hold key to harbor's future

Jim Dastur, "a very peaceful man who does not get emotional while expressing his views."


By Len Bose
March 28, 2014 | 5:48 p.m.

A couple of years ago at a Harbor Commission meeting, the topic of replacing some of our harbor's 18 miles of seawalls an estimated cost of $500 million was discussed.
Of course, the cost is what first grabbed my attention, along with how the commissioners responded to the topic. It was then that Marshall Duffield introduced me to the concept of a tidal gate and started to explain how these gates can protect the whole harbor.
Jump forward two years, and the idea of replacing seawalls was still being discussed at this month's Tidelands Management Committee meeting. Attending the meeting as concerned harbor users were Duffield and someone I was introduced to at the beginning of the year, Jim Dastur.
At this year's Tidelands meetings, Dastur has always presented himself as a very peaceful man who does not get emotional while expressing his views on why he feels that the city should proceed with a study on the feasibility of a floodgate at the entrance to our harbor. During this month's meeting, the committee gave Dastur the time to review his reasons on why a study is needed regarding tidal gates. Sitting next to me was Win Fuller, a local resident and active harbor user, who looked at me and said, "This guy is making the most sense."
After the meeting, Duffield walked up to Dastur, introduced himself, shook his hand and gave him a warm pat on the back. This is when the idea of talking to Dastur first came to mind, and I proceeded to ask him for an interview, which he graciously accepted.
Dastur has lived on Balboa Island for 22 years. He was educated as a civil structural engineer and worked in marine construction. He has worked on most of the big commercial docks in the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles. He also has taken part in the retrofitting of all the major bridges in the Bay Area. For three years, he was the head director of the American Society of Civil Engineers' Construction Institute. Dastur was also contracted by India to consult on the building of a nuclear power plant with a seawater intake system — not to mention the fact that he was also the interim CEO of the company that worked on the replacement of the New Orleans levees.
Dastur is the type of person who prefers not to talk about himself, but when he said, "I am talking from a lot of experience," I wanted him on our team. While discussing the replacement of our harbor's seawall, he said, "Rising the walls will not do the job. Unless the walls go way deep, way deep, all you are doing is preventing the water from coming over the top."

To proceed on this topic, you have to ask yourself which government agency, from around the world, is providing you with enough facts that our sea level is rising and by how much. It was reported at the Tidelands meeting that by 2050, the projected sea level will rise by 1.38 feet, with a 1% chance that tide height will be 9.09 feet and a 10% chance that it will be at 8.79 feet. Right now, our mean sea level is at 2.65 feet, and by 2050, it is projected to be 4.03.
Now look at today's water table on Balboa Island at plus three or plus four and consider that the water table could raise to plus six or seven within the next 30 years. This means that if we only replace our seawalls, the water won't come from over the top of the seawall but from under the ground.

It has been said, by one of our council members, that no politician will recommend to pay for a $200,000 study for a tidal gate. Dastur explained to me that "a study needs to be done to see if it is feasible. Before you throw out the concept, we should look at the study. The gate has to be looked at when you look at the harbor holistically and not confuse the gate with the condition of the seawalls."
A couple of things you should understand about tidal gates. Yes, they are very expensive. It would take about 10 years to build the gates. The gates are not up all the time. They would be on the bottom of the harbor channel and would only be raised about four and five times a year for about four hours at a time. In the future, they could be used as many as 15 times a year.
There is much more information on this topic to share with you, and I will post it on my blog. For what it's worth, I am in favor of urging our City Council members to have further discussion regarding tidal gates and would request that they consider moving forward with a study.




Len:
Thank you for your column in the Daily Pilot. As more people get interested in the issue, the greater possibility of an informed decision.
Warm regards.
Jim




Sea ya.

LEN BOSE is an experienced boater, yacht broker and boating columnist.

Wednesday, December 28, 2016

Jim Dasturs recommendation regarding the Balboa Island seawall.






The following is a letter sent to the Tidelands Management Committee from Jim Dastur.  When Jim talks I listen:


Dear Tidelands Management Committee:


Ever since the news broke, almost 3 years ago, about a plan to possibly spend upwards of $70,000,000 for new sea walls for Balboa Island, I have been trying to understand the need for and the details behind this evolving proposal. To the extent that I have knowledge of and experience in marine construction and engineering cost estimates, I have tried to put in my two cents worth. I am truly thankful to City Council members for having given me the opportunity to participate through my appointment to the Citizen's Advisory Panel to the Tidelands Management Committee.(TMC)

A lot of new, useful information has been provided by City staff during the last 3 meetings of TMC. I find it difficult to respond to facts and figures presented at the meeting without taking the time to understand and digest them over a period of time. My current understanding of the situation, along with my personal/professional opinion, for what it is worth, is as follows:
1. Balboa Island is protected from sea erosion and tidal flooding by a concrete wall, owned and maintained by the City. The total length of the wall is approximately 13,200 feet (+/-). The elevation of the top of the wall varies from a high of 9.1' to a low of 7.7'. 
2. Of the 13,200 feet of wall, about 3,800 feet (along the Grand Canal and the West end of the big island) has
deteriorated to the extent that it would be prudent to replace it within the next 5 to 7 years. There is no impending emergency to replace this section of the wall immediately, although planning, engineering and permitting needs to be addressed and is being addressed currently. The remaining 9,400 feet of wall has at least 20 to 25 years of useful life left, with normal routine maintenance. (This conclusion was supported by the City's consultant at one of the TMC meetings) With competing claims for scarce tax dollars, it would be a non-starter to consider any replacement of this section of the wall, any time soon.
3. There is general consensus that the sea level has risen in the past 20 years and is continuing to rise. The top elevation of 7.7' for a significant portion of the existing sea wall poses a present and imminent danger of swamping the island during a king tide combined with an ocean surge and a heavy rain storm. The probability of this happening may be small, but the consequences would be catastrophic. This issue needs to be addressed on an expedited basis.
4. The political football as to who should pay for any or all of the costs associated with these issues is finally being kicked around. The suggestion that Balboa Island property owners be required to pick up a substantial portion of the costs associated with sea walls, further muddies the already murky waters.
5. Current thinking and planning is for the City to put all issues - the entire 13,200 feet of the sea walls, ferry terminal & fuel dock, bridge retrofits, etc. - into one package for permitting and financing; this leads to the daunting $72,000,000 number. It also forces a design decision for 75% of the wall that does not need to be made for the next 25 years.
Based on the above premises, I would like to put forth these ideas for your consideration.
A.  As a first order of business, engineer and construct a cap addition to the 9,400 feet of wall that has a remaining life expectancy of 25 years, so that the top elevation is 9'. This can be accomplished along the lines of the cap addition done to the Little Island's South Bay Front. This would not entail any extraneous issues such as access to private docks and the beach, permitting for encroachment, ADA issues, home-owner views, etc. The total cost associated with this, per the City's estimate of $250 - $300 per foot would be $2.4 to $2.8 million. The cost for this should be borne by the City. Do not have this issue tied up with planning or permitting for a new wall.
     The reason for opting for a height limit of elevation 9.0 is that this 9,400 feet long wall will be replaced at some date in the distant future. At that time, we will have a better understanding of how fast the sea is rising as well as what is being done holistically about rising sea level for the rest of the inner harbor.
B.  Proceed cautiously with the planning, engineering and permitting of the 3,400 feet of new wall. The total cost associated with this, per the City's estimate of $3,800 - $4,000 per foot (I believe this number already has contingencies built into it and does not need additional contingency on top of that) would be $14.4 to $15.2 million. Since this is a new wall and expected to serve for the next 75 to 100 years, the preferred top elevation should be 10'. The City should be able to find the money, from the tidelands fund and supplemented by the General Fund, to get this done over the next 5 to 7 years.
C. Its is premature and counter-productive to reconfigure the entire ferry landing for future high tides. Re-grading the sidewalk and Agate street to provide protection up to elevation 9' can be accomplished at minimal cost out of the General Fund. The same applies to retrofitting of bridges.
The above course of action reduces the monumental $72,000,000 problem to a more manageable $15,000,000 to $20,000,000 problem that addresses issues for the next 20 to 25 years while we continue to look for holistic solutions for the entire harbor, for the future beyond.
I am available to meet with anyone of you if you are so inclined, to discuss my views in detail.
Thank you for your indulgence in reading this presentation.
Jim Dastur

Sunday, December 18, 2016

Last Harbor Commission meeting of the year.

Harbor Commissioner and Cruiser director Paul Blank  “Eel Grass, the more we have the more we can disturb” 


About fifty people attended the last Harbor Commission meeting of the year that was convened on Saturday, December 10th at 8:30AM aboard Seymour Beek’s car ferry “Admiral.”
Harbor Commissioner Paul Blank was assigned the task of cruise director and outlined the cruise around the harbor. Our first topic was derelict vessels on the different offshore mooring around the harbor. Commissioner Joe Stapleton took over the mic and defined what a derelict boat is, according to Stapleton, a vessel must propel itself too and from the Harbor Department docks. By completing this task the vessels owner is proving the boat is operational. Other definitions I have heard over the years also included that the vessel is not taking on water and or in disrepair. Stapleton went on to praise Harbor Resources Analyst Shannon Levin on all her hard work she has done maintaining the Vessel Turn In Program (VTIP) which is a grant from the state of California with a value of $120,000 per year. This grant allows boat owners to relinquish their vessels title to the city for demolition and to date the City of Newport Beach has removed twenty-eight boats over the last two years. It is my understanding that the City has applied again for the VTIP program for next year. Mooring permit holders by now should all know that they do not have to keep a vessel on their moorings any longer. 

Next topic up was our harbors ten waste pump out stations. Commissioner David Girling explained that the problem the city is having is that boats operators are using the waste pumps to pump out their bilge’s. Quite often these bilges have toxic waste in them along with shape  objects. The shape objects are breaking down the pump systems and is the number one cause for their malfunction. Please note that while operating the pump system to note and follow the written instructions. My opinion is that we should have marine recycling centers around town so that boat operators have a place to dispose of types of hazardous waste rather than using our waste pump out stations. 



About this time the ferry was approaching channel marker 11 off of Bay Island. When City Council member elect Brad Avery was asked to talk about the navigational markers around the harbor. Avery was quick to point out that the Coast Guard is responsible for the maintenance of these channel markers and are the only ones that have permission to remove them when damaged. We have seen this problem twice now over the last ten years with the Coast Guard taking over a year to remove these damaged markers. These oversized commercial markers truly are a threat to our local boaters and need to be replaced with a smaller buoys around our harbor Avery explained. 

Recycling center

As we made the turn heading west around the number 11 channel marker Commissioner West was asked to review the new RGP 54 and Eel grass mitigation plan. “ This project has been done with no little expense with as many as six or seven state agencies involved. “ said West. Today Harbor Resources has received fifty applications with only a hand full of residents able to complete the process. “ There is still some red tape in the process and more work to be done, the devil is always in the details.” said West. Because of the RGP and the Eel Grass Medication plan dredging companies are willing to return to our harbor, at this time there are only two companies working our harbor. What now needs to be remembered is that Eel Grass is now our friend and as Commissioner Blank asked the crowd to repeat a number of times during the cruise “ Eel Grass, the more we have, the more we can disturb!” I am tempted to make some T- shirts with this saying on them and give a couple to Blank.
Why are these boats in our Harbor?


Alternative Anchorages was the next topic on the agenda and of course we are referring to the temporary anchorage in front of Lido Village or Z Mark. Over the last two years it has been very successful and with the addition of a public dock off of Central Ave, right next to the Elks Club, I am going to assume it will not be temporary much longer. Please note that this anchorage will not have raft ups and the noise levels will be closely monitored.

Other topics that where discussed was the public walk way starting from the previous Ardell property heading west rapping around the harbor and ending up by the Cannery. Harbor speed limits, boat overhang and all the different harbor users meeting together and reviewing their individual needs with each other was also discussed on the cruise.
Why are these boats in our Harbor?


Next up was the four acre Lower Castaways property that is designated as a Marine Protected Area by our States Department of Fish and Wildlife and will most likely be turned into a park. The only access to the harbor will be for manual propelled crafts. You might not know it, there is access to the harbor now on this site and from what I have heard one of the hottest fishing spots in the harbor.

Our last topic was Launch Ramps and where can the city place another one in our harbor. Commissioner McIntosh is chairing this task and said “ I have no clue, we have been talking about this for years. The problem is not only the ramp it is the parking. If you have any ideas please let me know.” The need for a second launch ramp in town is tremendous and the only way I see it happening is we are going to have to want it. The only place that I have found is next to Newport Aquatic Center. Told you we are going to have to want it! On a side note, the launch ramp at the Dunes was a night mare the first night of the boat parade this year. With the low tide at an extreme many people where not able to launch their vessels. I feel we need to do better at this matter.

Boat name of the week “Admiral.”



Sea ya








Sunday, December 11, 2016

2016 Harbor 20 Fleet One Photo's

One photo is worth a thousand words? Well then, Fleet One has a lot to say in 2016: